November 28, 2021, 07:52:20 PM
Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: Metric System Help  (Read 749 times)

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May 10, 2020, 07:40:35 AM
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MDGross


Thanks to Teddy we have detailed photos of the ravine and stream. Did I understand the photo correctly in that the deepest part of the ravine is 175 cm? I believe that's a little more than 5 1/2 feet. The first photo shows the ravine with snow. Maybe I'm wrong, but it hardly seems falling (or perhaps sliding) into the ravine would cause such fatal injuries to the hikers. Theories that claim the injuries were caused by striking rocks as they fell may need reevaluation.
 

May 11, 2020, 04:13:16 PM
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
The use of the word or term RAVINE maybe stretching it a bit in this Dyatlov Case. Ive seen much bigger gulleys and Streams etc, in Sussex, England, and they arent called Ravines.  Ravine sounds like something substantial. It gives the impression of some great width and great height. Clearly the so called Ravine that we are fixated on is neither.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2020, 03:53:41 AM by Teddy »
DB
 

May 12, 2020, 04:53:12 PM
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PJ


Yes, ravine is usually something bigger than gully so maybe gully will be more adequate for this place but anyway, after looking on photos it is clear how it all looks like. So I think we could stay will ravine to not make more confusion.

From the summer pictures the highest point of edge in the ravine is 2.8m (9 feet). In winter wind could create vertical snowdrift/snow bank at the edge of about 4m high - the den and bodies was found under 3.5-4.5m of snow.  Is hard to compare morphology of this ravine in winter and summer.
 

May 16, 2020, 02:25:09 PM
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
Yes, ravine is usually something bigger than gully so maybe gully will be more adequate for this place but anyway, after looking on photos it is clear how it all looks like. So I think we could stay will ravine to not make more confusion.

From the summer pictures the highest point of edge in the ravine is 2.8m (9 feet). In winter wind could create vertical snowdrift/snow bank at the edge of about 4m high - the den and bodies was found under 3.5-4.5m of snow.  Is hard to compare morphology of this ravine in winter and summer.

Yes I agree we need to stick with Ravine because its become the accepted word or term for this particular location.
DB