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Author Topic: The many twists of fate among 9 tragic people  (Read 3766 times)

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May 13, 2023, 05:51:25 AM
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eurocentric


I realise this will be a downbeat thread, and I hope it doesn't have everyone weeping.

Lyuda was sealed in a coffin the day before her 21st birthday. I don't know if that age was considered a big event in Soviet Russia. Back then in the UK it was the 'age-of-majority' when all parental control legally ceased, you could legally marry (later reduced to 18), and birthday cards featured plastic keys as a symbol of newfound freedom. Instead, for her, the door was shut right as adulthood began.

A surviving sister, Irina, who lost 2 Doroshenko brothers to the mountains, the other brother dying from a heart attack at altitude.

Tibo and Igor begging their mothers for one last hike, and so it was to be.

A war veteran, who I'm sure will would have spent many nights in dug outs and trenches in freezing weather, at times avoiding  bombardment or hoping his luck would hold out, who was found dead in a ditch with the sort of injuries which being thrown by a mortar shell might create.

An urban revolutionary who loved his banned songs, whose favourite contemporary pop song was, of all things, I Love You Life, his mother writing the lyrics on a handkerchief and wrapping it around a rock, her son no doubt her rock, and keeping it as a memento on her mantlepiece.

A highly intelligent undergraduate nuclear physics student, capable of dominating any debate, who never fulfilled his academic promise, and whose 'birthday', St Aleksander's Day or whatever it actually was, saw him have not a piece of cake but a segment of a tangerine, which he shared with the others.

A lovestruck girl who obviously hoped she might rekindle things with the man who once saved her from a bear, and who on this hike offered his gloves to keep her warm, a man who was to die a few days after his 21st, still gallantly protective to the end.

And finally, the thing which always cuts me deepest, so much so I wouldn't have been able to type this a year ago, because of its powerful sense of prophesy, and the importance of having opportunity to say goodbye. The well-mannered Rustem's last sentence to his parents on a Vizhay postcard, where he sought to apologise for dashing off, distracted as he was by getting ready for the hike and not managing to bid them farewell. It was the only personal thing he wrote and would clearly have been to the forefront of his mind. I read it as though fate took him and made his farewell to his next-of-kin impossible.

https://dyatlovpass.com/resources/340/Rustem-Slobodin-last-post-card-back.jpg


I am sorry I didn't say goodbye -

- got carried away.




My DPI approach - logic, probability and reason.
 
The following users thanked this post: Teddy, marieuk, Dimitris68

May 24, 2023, 10:34:51 PM
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anna_pycckux


My last book was published in April 2023, and it tells about the mockery of the higher powers over humanity. The history of Dyatlov's group is a confirmation of this. An evil grin, or rather, an un-literary, untranslatable slang expression - BANTER ("СТЕБ" "STJEB) Igor was prophesied a great future, Lyudmila dreamed of great love, Zolotarev, who heroically passed the entire war, was brutally murdered in peacetime by his own compatriots... etc..
Higher, dark forces act by the hands of dark people. Let's remember how Kirilenko, the head of the regional committee, saw off the search engines (quote by Boris Slobtsov): "See if you can find how they escaped to Norway without pants!" What is this, if not banter (СТЕБ)??
« Last Edit: May 25, 2023, 11:46:22 AM by anna_pycckux »
 

May 25, 2023, 02:13:54 AM
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Ziljoe


Can you put the link up to the quote Anna, for more context.
 

May 25, 2023, 12:16:43 PM
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anna_pycckux


Can you put the link up to the quote Anna, for more context.
Those who wish to read the full text of my book "Counterclaim at the Last Judgment" © can write to me by email anna_pycckux@mail.ru I will send an electronic version of the book, but only in Russian.
The text of the book is protected by copyright. It is impossible to copy without a link to the author.

 

May 25, 2023, 05:07:41 PM
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Ziljoe


Sorry Anna, I meant the source of this quote below. The original transcript or documentation.

(quote by Boris Slobtsov): "See if you can find how they escaped to Norway without pants!"
 

May 25, 2023, 10:16:42 PM
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anna_pycckux


Sorry Anna, I meant the source of this quote below. The original transcript or documentation.
(quote by Boris Slobtsov): "See if you can find how they escaped to Norway without pants!"
Boris Slobtsov said this phrase on Channel 1 TV watch my video  0:06
эту фразу Борис Слобцов сказал на 1 канале ТВ смотри мой ролик.   0:06

« Last Edit: May 25, 2023, 10:22:18 PM by anna_pycckux »
 

May 26, 2023, 04:59:42 AM
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Manti


What were the most common "escape routes" from the USSR? Of course the Dyatlov group weren't near any border, but I am just curious. I would think, if they wanted to "escape", they should have joined the fishing club not the skiing club, and went on a whale-watching expedition to the Kuril Islands, for example.


 

May 26, 2023, 05:44:35 AM
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anna_pycckux


What were the most common "escape routes" from the USSR? Of course the Dyatlov group weren't near any border, but I am just curious. I would think, if they wanted to "escape", they should have joined the fishing club not the skiing club, and went on a whale-watching expedition to the Kuril Islands, for example.
The topic of false denunciation of the escape has already been discussed.
https://forum.dyatlovpass.com/index.php?topic=1369.0