October 21, 2021, 11:27:16 AM
Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: "Enhanced Service Mode" ie Gulikov's theory  (Read 2299 times)

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January 28, 2021, 01:45:26 PM
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KFinn


This may be along the lines of a cultural question and in searching, I have not been able to confirm or deny this.  Alexander Gulikov theorized that the military was on restriction during the XXI Congress of the Communist Party (which took place at the same time as the Dyatlov hike, and which the Dyatlov group had dedicated their hike to.) He referred to "enhanced service mode," which supposedly meant all leave was on hold, no tests could take place, no equipment could be signed out, etc (my understanding from reading McKloskey's book and the theories section on this site.)  Can anyone attest to whether such a policy was in place during the congress?  I can not find anything on Galikov's sources about this.  I do not know enough about post-WWII Soviet military protocols and I am not even certain how I'd be able to confirm or deny such a policy. 
-Ren
 

March 23, 2021, 01:42:06 PM
Reply #1
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KFinn


Just wanted to update.  I've not found any conclusive answers one way or the other on whether the military was under restriction during the Twenty-First Congress (which would potentially rule out any organized military event.)   I've spent the last two or three weeks delving into Khruschev's military policies and relationship with the military circa 1959.  It was obviously a very complex relationship; he was severely cutting back on military personnel in favor of funding rockets and he also feared the military gaining too much power.  As a westerner, I've always taken for granted that the military is an extension if government and while that was true in Soviet Russia, it was also an adversarial relationship.  So, without any more proof that there was a restriction on military at the time if Dyatlov, I am at an impasse.  It would be great to rule out/in definitively but I'm still on the hunt for an answer!!!
-Ren
 

April 02, 2021, 05:07:12 PM
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
Just wanted to update.  I've not found any conclusive answers one way or the other on whether the military was under restriction during the Twenty-First Congress (which would potentially rule out any organized military event.)   I've spent the last two or three weeks delving into Khruschev's military policies and relationship with the military circa 1959.  It was obviously a very complex relationship; he was severely cutting back on military personnel in favor of funding rockets and he also feared the military gaining too much power.  As a westerner, I've always taken for granted that the military is an extension if government and while that was true in Soviet Russia, it was also an adversarial relationship.  So, without any more proof that there was a restriction on military at the time if Dyatlov, I am at an impasse.  It would be great to rule out/in definitively but I'm still on the hunt for an answer!!!

Best bet would be the Archives of the KGB. But thats one bet we wont be allowed to bet on because there is no way we are going to see the Archives of the KGB unless we are very privileged and accepted by Vlad.
DB
 

April 02, 2021, 06:14:46 PM
Reply #3
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KFinn


Just wanted to update.  I've not found any conclusive answers one way or the other on whether the military was under restriction during the Twenty-First Congress (which would potentially rule out any organized military event.)   I've spent the last two or three weeks delving into Khruschev's military policies and relationship with the military circa 1959.  It was obviously a very complex relationship; he was severely cutting back on military personnel in favor of funding rockets and he also feared the military gaining too much power.  As a westerner, I've always taken for granted that the military is an extension if government and while that was true in Soviet Russia, it was also an adversarial relationship.  So, without any more proof that there was a restriction on military at the time if Dyatlov, I am at an impasse.  It would be great to rule out/in definitively but I'm still on the hunt for an answer!!!

Best bet would be the Archives of the KGB. But thats one bet we wont be allowed to bet on because there is no way we are going to see the Archives of the KGB unless we are very privileged and accepted by Vlad.

Yeah, I am highly doubtful he would ever consider allowing me to do that, even so.  One look at either my social media presence or my prior career and the stamp would say "hell no!"
-Ren
 

April 03, 2021, 03:33:14 PM
Reply #4
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
Just wanted to update.  I've not found any conclusive answers one way or the other on whether the military was under restriction during the Twenty-First Congress (which would potentially rule out any organized military event.)   I've spent the last two or three weeks delving into Khruschev's military policies and relationship with the military circa 1959.  It was obviously a very complex relationship; he was severely cutting back on military personnel in favor of funding rockets and he also feared the military gaining too much power.  As a westerner, I've always taken for granted that the military is an extension if government and while that was true in Soviet Russia, it was also an adversarial relationship.  So, without any more proof that there was a restriction on military at the time if Dyatlov, I am at an impasse.  It would be great to rule out/in definitively but I'm still on the hunt for an answer!!!

Best bet would be the Archives of the KGB. But thats one bet we wont be allowed to bet on because there is no way we are going to see the Archives of the KGB unless we are very privileged and accepted by Vlad.

Yeah, I am highly doubtful he would ever consider allowing me to do that, even so.  One look at either my social media presence or my prior career and the stamp would say "hell no!"

Never say no. Nikita Khrushchev visited England in 1956 during the so called Cold War. He was given a great reception. Look at this rare archive 
DB
 

April 03, 2021, 05:22:55 PM
Reply #5
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KFinn


Just wanted to update.  I've not found any conclusive answers one way or the other on whether the military was under restriction during the Twenty-First Congress (which would potentially rule out any organized military event.)   I've spent the last two or three weeks delving into Khruschev's military policies and relationship with the military circa 1959.  It was obviously a very complex relationship; he was severely cutting back on military personnel in favor of funding rockets and he also feared the military gaining too much power.  As a westerner, I've always taken for granted that the military is an extension if government and while that was true in Soviet Russia, it was also an adversarial relationship.  So, without any more proof that there was a restriction on military at the time if Dyatlov, I am at an impasse.  It would be great to rule out/in definitively but I'm still on the hunt for an answer!!!

Best bet would be the Archives of the KGB. But thats one bet we wont be allowed to bet on because there is no way we are going to see the Archives of the KGB unless we are very privileged and accepted by Vlad.

Yeah, I am highly doubtful he would ever consider allowing me to do that, even so.  One look at either my social media presence or my prior career and the stamp would say "hell no!"

Never say no. Nikita Khrushchev visited England in 1956 during the so called Cold War. He was given a great reception. Look at this rare archive 

That is so cool!!  Thank you for sharing!!!
-Ren
 

April 09, 2021, 02:53:18 PM
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marieuk


That's a great bit of film.  Do people still turn out like that to see leaders from other countries I wonder.   Loved the history of it and seeing the steam trains. Thank you for sharing.
 

April 09, 2021, 03:03:28 PM
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
That's a great bit of film.  Do people still turn out like that to see leaders from other countries I wonder.   Loved the history of it and seeing the steam trains. Thank you for sharing.

Well I was in Portsmouth during the D Day Remembrance Event in 2019 when many World Leaders attended at Southsea Common, including President Trump, and there was nothing like that welcome that Nikita Khrushchev had. President Trump flew in by Helicopter and flew out by Helicopter, no walkaround.
DB