Theories Discussion > General Discussion

The Instinct of Self Preservation

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MDGross:
When something unexpected happens, something that possibly puts your life in danger, chemicals release in your brain and neurons send out one command: Run for your life. When a shooter fires into a crowd, people don't calmly walk away, they run for their lives. If something unexpected suddenly happened to the Dyatlov group – balls of fire rolling toward the tent (the ball lightning scenario), a frightening snow or ice slippage, a tent enveloped in nitrous oxide fumes (the exploded missile scenario) – it's human nature to run for your life. Yet, the hikers seemed to walk in an orderly fashion down the slope.
Does that rule out a dangerous occurrence like the ones above and a number of other theories?
Could that indicate that an outside party – KGB, CIA, Soviet military, escaped prisoners or someone else – forced the hikers to leave the tent without shoes and coats? That to deflect any involvement, the outside group made the hikers walk down the slope, knowing that the harsh conditions would finish them off?
I'm just putting the question out there. Perhaps it's worth considering.

Ziljoe:
Hi MDGross

Yes it could.....I can only see 3 scenarios, all have their problems though.

1/ Outsiders, with a gun or outnumbering the group. Any outsiders would need to have watched the group to assess who they were and if they had weapons etc. If it were prisoners, they wouldn't want to randomly pick on a tent in case the group they were attacking were more powerful. I can't see the KGB or military chasing after them. There may have been some faction, group or local Mafia like Jean Daniel Reuss suggested and the hikers were  pawns in some power struggle. I could see them being forced away down the slope , although why not make more of them take off their boots, hats and clothes?

2/ the Wolverine theory covers the lack of panic after leaving the tent , the rest that follows makes sense to me.

3/ Some sort of snow slide that they were unsure of, that didn't cause the injuries in the tent but enough to make them unsure if it was safe to even try and retrieve more equipment.

It's the only 3 scenarios I can think of that come close to explaning the findings . Unless it was staged. I can't think of anything else...

MDGross:
Hi Ziljoe,

Any of your three scenarios is possible. Here are a few of my thoughts:
1. Outsiders. I feel strongest about an espionage scenario, which all turns on Zolotaryov. Was it even Zolotaryov or someone posing as him? What was his motivation for trying to pass Soviet secrets?
2. Wolverine. I haven't found the energy to translate all the Russian posts on this subject into English. I did check online with Alaska Game & Wildlife (lots of wolverines in Alaska) and they have never recorded an incident of a wolverine attacking a human. Also, unlike a skunk, a wolverine does not use its scent as a defensive weapon, but only in mating and to mark territory.
3. Snow slide. If they were unsure of it, why didn't they take the time to dress properly.

As Igor and Teddy suggest, another scenario, would be that a tree fell on the tent as they slept.

GlennM:
What bothers me is reconciling a slab avalanche with the description of the tent contents. I think nine trapped people would demolish the tent on the inside trying to get out from under the crush of ice. That would be the panic phase. Soon after, panic is replaced by cold induced lethargy. They walked to the woods.We know the rest.

Charles:

--- Quote from: GlennM on September 18, 2022, 07:48:13 AM ---What bothers me is reconciling a slab avalanche with the description of the tent contents. I think nine trapped people would demolish the tent on the inside trying to get out from under the crush of ice. That would be the panic phase. Soon after, panic is replaced by cold induced lethargy. They walked to the woods.We know the rest.
--- End quote ---

Why would they "panic"? Why not just swearing and throwing insults? What would be the basis of "panic"? The rescuers didn't find any remains of avalanche. And if there was one it was small. And the angle of the slope was just at the limit of possibility of avalanche, which means that any hypothetical very limited avalanche would have been slow and with low energy.

Where from do you imagine "panic"? I sailed a lot in winter in North Atlantic when I was a student, we sometime experienced broach or falling off, we never panicked... in the middle of storms in January offshore in North Atlantic... we had girls aboard, they never panicked: they were preparing coffee and lighting cigarets in the cockpit for us... and toasts with butter and jam... they were as wet and as frozen as we were on the deck... and the situation was much worse than on the solid ground of the Urals. I remember a girl who vomited in the toilets, and covered the walls with her previous meal: she was of Scottish origin and we all had fun of her "Highlander war cries", because she was shouting like a Scottish warrior of the XIVth century, when puking, a very sophisticated girl otherwise... So young educated French people laugh at the discomfort of North Atlantic ocean in winter but young Russians became hysterical because of a small snow slide on their tent ???

We have 15 years old girl in our French family, a girl who is very found about sailing: this summer she came back covered with bruises (regatta releases doses of adrenaline that completely make you forget the pain). She is beautiful, tall and slim, elegant, smart, brilliant and very sensitive, but she likes the sea and the elements: wind, waves, cold water, Atlantic ocean... did she complain about the pain, the bruises and the discomfort? She asked for more... she asked to go back to Brittany in October and for Christmas, for "Winter Trainings" (entraînements d'hiver)... Youth is generous and likes risk and pushing to the limits...

This idea of "panic", it is absolutely insulting to the Russian youth of the late 1950s...

And see the skiers, here, in the 2020s:



So, please stop with the accusations of "panic" and hysteria among the Russian hikers of 1959. It is pure nonsense, and a kind of "Russian bashing". If the Russian students ever suffered a slab slip, they would have shouted out their complete inventory of insults, like in:



and that's all.

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