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Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: On Alcohol  (Read 2877 times)

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March 22, 2018, 12:55:20 PM
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Armide


I've been reading over some of of the books and something in "An Unknown Compelling Force" by Clark Wilkins caught my eye. He basically mentions flasks of "medicinal" alcohol being found (I guess he's assuming it was not truly used as a medicinal alcohol) at the scene and Igor being under the influence by the time of the tragedy. He then goes on to say that the search group found 'vodka' at the scene, which I don't remember reading about, and also mentions that the full bladders of some of the hikers may have been due to intoxication. What I fail to understand is why he would assume this, especially considering the coroner clearly states that the investigation revealed no traces of alcohol in their systems.

Is there something I'm missing, or is this just a mistake made by Wilkins?
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 12:57:29 AM by Armide »
 

March 27, 2018, 08:44:04 PM
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BottledBrunette


I thought the autopsy report said none of the tourists had alcohol in their system?  Where did you see that Igor had alcohol in his system?  Yuri Yudin said alcohol consumption was none to minimal in all the hikes he went on.
 

March 28, 2018, 09:37:59 AM
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Armide


I just read it in Wilkins's book, but I don't think it's true. I know that the autopsy said that they had no alcohol in their system, so that's just why I was confused about the matter. I also know that the members of the group were smart enough not to get blackout drunk at 1079m altitude in the middle of the Urals. I just wanted to see if anyone else had any conflicting information about the alcohol on the trip.
 

March 30, 2018, 07:55:49 AM
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Loose}{Cannon

Global Moderator
Not on alcohol, but from what I understand, there was a more in-depth toxicology investigation ordered to be done on blood/tissue samples from each victim.  The resulting report is nowhere in the released casefiles.  One would have to wonder why it was not released.  bat1 
All theories are flawed....... Get Behind Me Satan !!!
 

March 31, 2018, 01:15:26 AM
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BottledBrunette


Another mystery in an enigmatic mystery.  bang1  That's weird that that wasn't included in the autopsy report.   nea1
 

March 31, 2018, 10:07:36 AM
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Loose}{Cannon

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Another mystery in an enigmatic mystery.  bang1  That's weird that that wasn't included in the autopsy report.   nea1

Basically, it was a different deal where the samples were sent to a different location for analysis.  But yeah...... its not in the case files.   
All theories are flawed....... Get Behind Me Satan !!!
 

April 26, 2018, 01:17:29 AM
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Armide


Okay, so maybe the alcohol thing may have been a red herring, but I still think I've found something fishy (no pun intended). In the recently posted nurse testimonies, they mention that a piece of their livers needed to be harvested be sent off "elsewhere" for analysis. Where this was and where this report is now, no one seems to know. Let's assume we'll never what happened to these analyses. We know that Vozrozhdenny was as unreliable and sloppy as they come, and he proudly asserts that no alcohol was found in the bodies, which shocks me. After doing some very basic research, it's actually incredible hard to determine whether or not a person was inebriated at the time of death, and even harder if the body has already begun decaying. There's a phenomenon of microbial fermentation after the death of a person, which eventually turns into the same molecule as alcohol and can easily be confused as such. Considering that at least four of the Dyatlov pass group's bodies were already at a stage of advanced decomposition, some ethanol must have been found in their systems somehow. On top of this, there is no way whatsoever Vozrozhdenny could have come to the conclusion that the ravine four were found without alcohol in their system, especially considering most of them were found amongst melted snow in a small stream, meaning a higher chance of distillation of the ethanol that may have been present in the body.

I'm in no way an expert in the fields, so it's more than likely that I'm wrong, but I do recommend everyone interested to read the abstract of this publication to get some insight on the matter: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16782292

TL;DR, I have no clue how Vozrozhdenny would have come to the conclusion that there was no alcohol whatsoever in the systems of the hikers considering all of the external factors present.
 

February 10, 2019, 12:11:11 PM
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Wonderer


Hello, this is my first post on this forum.

I have found some conflicting information about alcohol being found in the blood of Igor Dyatlov.

In the autopsy report on this site, the translated report states: ”The investigation discovered no presence of alcohol.”

However, on ****.com, the report states: ”The presence of alcohol is detected in the investigation.”

Obviously one of these is wrong. Can somebody, maybe one of our Russian friends, give us the definite answer based on the original autopsy report? Was there alcohol in the blood of Dyatlov, or any other member of the group?

EDIT: For some reason the message board is cencoring the address of the site I’m referring to.
 

February 11, 2019, 02:25:54 PM
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
Hello, this is my first post on this forum.

I have found some conflicting information about alcohol being found in the blood of Igor Dyatlov.

In the autopsy report on this site, the translated report states: ”The investigation discovered no presence of alcohol.”

However, on ****.com, the report states: ”The presence of alcohol is detected in the investigation.”

Obviously one of these is wrong. Can somebody, maybe one of our Russian friends, give us the definite answer based on the original autopsy report? Was there alcohol in the blood of Dyatlov, or any other member of the group?

EDIT: For some reason the message board is cencoring the address of the site I’m referring to.

As far as I know there was no alcohol found in the blood of Igor Dyatlov.  The time limit for establishing if alcohol is present in blood is usually not very long ie around a day at most.  Sometimes it can be much longer but it depends on the circumstances. No evidence that any of the Dyatlov Group carried or consumed a lot of alcohol.     
DB