November 27, 2021, 06:11:20 PM
Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: Gravity Wind  (Read 7053 times)

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December 24, 2019, 02:28:29 PM
Reply #60
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Nigel Evans


Per your theory, how long did the hikers live once they began inhaling toxic fume? Minutes? Hours? Can the orange tint of their skin be explained by something else? Perhaps the missile test happened later in Feb. after the hikers were dead. Could toxic material seep into the snow and affect the bodies' skin color?


Semyon and Lyudmila died of internal bleeding shortly after receiving their rib cage injuries which seems to limit the timeline to that night (i assert). Rustem probably died of internal bleeding compounded with cold.


For more on nitric acid just google it, e.g. https://journals.lww.com/em-news/Fulltext/2002/02000/The_Diagnosis__Nitric_Acid_Burn.20.aspx
 

January 15, 2020, 12:42:19 AM
Reply #61
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Zorah


I know this conversation is quite a while ago now. ...Just reading through and thought I'd add my 2 cents worth: that I always considered the grey foam on Doroshenko's cheek to be due to hypothermia-induced pulmonary edema, which, although certainly not ubiquitous in deaths of this kind, is not rare either.
 

January 15, 2020, 12:52:14 AM
Reply #62
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Nigel Evans


I know this conversation is quite a while ago now. ...Just reading through and thought I'd add my 2 cents worth: that I always considered the grey foam on Doroshenko's cheek to be due to hypothermia-induced pulmonary edema, which, although certainly not ubiquitous in deaths of this kind, is not rare either.
Thanks i've learnt something.
 

January 15, 2020, 12:52:37 AM
Reply #63
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Zorah


Also, something I've been meaning to bring up in a more general thread: I am very interested in the history of mountaineering in the Himalaya. In the course of my meanderings in the past few years on this subject, I've come across several photos of corpses frozen in cold, dry places. Where they were exposed to sun and wind, very often the flesh seems to turn a strange brownish orange colour. I won't post here, but anyone can do an image search for "Mt Everest Hannelore Schmatz" to see an example of what I mean.

Now, about the white hair...next subject for research.  wink1
« Last Edit: January 15, 2020, 12:56:58 AM by Zorah »
 

January 15, 2020, 12:55:15 AM
Reply #64
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Zorah



[/quote]
Thanks i've learnt something.
[/quote]

 

Zorah: hiker, wilderness explorer, pathophysiology geek, nurse. At your service  thanky1  wink1
 

January 15, 2020, 12:56:51 AM
Reply #65
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Nigel Evans



Thanks i've learnt something.


 

Zorah: hiker, wilderness explorer, pathophysiology geek, nurse. At your service  thanky1 wink1
 kewl1
What's your opinion about the footprints? How can windblown snow (powder) at -10C and retain footprints for 3 weeks?
 

January 15, 2020, 01:05:23 AM
Reply #66
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Zorah



Thanks i've learnt something.


 


 kewl1
What's your opinion about the footprints? How can windblown snow (powder) at -10C and retain footprints for 3 weeks?

Raised footprints: because of the pressure of the weight coming down, the snow beneath the foot is compessed. Because it is more densely packed than the looser snow around, it will erode more slowly, comparatively. It doesn't occur in all conditions. I should try it in my front yard and see if I can produce some raised footprints.

I am by no means an expert on snow conditions. My instinct is to say that if there was some massive source of heat present, the footprint evidence would have looked different. There might have been a single identifiable level of melting (like from a flash of heat) that would have been obvious to the investigators.

Now I am wondering. What happens when a strong electrical surge hits a snowy area? Worthy of research... wink1
 

January 15, 2020, 01:14:17 AM
Reply #67
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Nigel Evans



Thanks i've learnt something.


 


 kewl1
What's your opinion about the footprints? How can windblown snow (powder) at -10C and retain footprints for 3 weeks?

Raised footprints: because of the pressure of the weight coming down, the snow beneath the foot is compessed. Because it is more densely packed than the looser snow around, it will erode more slowly, comparatively. It doesn't occur in all conditions. I should try it in my front yard and see if I can produce some raised footprints.

I am by no means an expert on snow conditions. My instinct is to say that if there was some massive source of heat present, the footprint evidence would have looked different. There might have been a single identifiable level of melting (like from a flash of heat) that would have been obvious to the investigators.

Now I am wondering. What happens when a strong electrical surge hits a snowy area? Worthy of research... wink1
Careful with your research!  whacky1
From my experience of skiing, wind blown powder at -10C and below doesn't compress like that. It has to be warmer, closer to 0C. It's my understanding that attempts to recreate the footprints during winter expeditions to the DP have failed.
 

January 15, 2020, 07:56:52 AM
Reply #68
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MDGross


Thank you, Zorah, for your expertise. I respect Nigel's breadth of knowledge about the Dyatlov Pass Incident, but we're not in agreement on the cause of the group's death. He favors, I believe, a fatal release of nitric acid from a missile explosion. I and many others think a natural disaster or weather related phenomenon, or at least what the group believed was a disaster about to befall them, led to their terribly unprepared dash to the trees below. Your insights about orange colored skin, foam on the cheek and raised footprints help explain these mysteries as more naturally occurring. The cause of the group's death remains speculation, however, and probably always will.
 

January 15, 2020, 09:55:26 AM
Reply #69
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Zorah



Thanks i've learnt something.


 


 kewl1
What's your opinion about the footprints? How can windblown snow (powder) at -10C and retain footprints for 3 weeks?

Careful with your research!  whacky1
From my experience of skiing, wind blown powder at -10C and below doesn't compress like that. It has to be warmer, closer to 0C. It's my understanding that attempts to recreate the footprints during winter expeditions to the DP have failed.

I spent my childhood and adolescence on cross country skis, spending several hours a week touring about on frozen lakes and nearby hills and fields. I can remember raised impressions of ski tracks. It seems to me that the type of snow mattered more than the overall air temperature at the time; fine dry powdery snow (which is indeed more common at low temperatures) would not hold impressions well. But if any snow with a high moisture content was present (that's not a technical term, just my attempt to qualify it), it would show tracks for a long time, including raised impressions after windy days.

Watch the headlines to see news of my experiments: "Mysterious Orbs and Light Flashes Spotted Over Western Canada"....hopefully I will survive unscathed. And with no new white hairs.