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Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: Zina's Letters  (Read 1976 times)

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May 14, 2020, 01:24:43 AM
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sparrow


In reading Zina's letters tonight, I have come to a conclusion .  I believe she is the one who burned the jacket.

She states that she loves Yuri, she is jealous when she sees him with other girls and that this trip is going to be hard because he is going too.

In her diary, she states:  27/1/59  "Today I wore Yuri's mittens, but how I did not want to!"
                                         29/1/59 "We talked about the past.  Such a playboy."  (her, Rustem and Yuri talked)
                                         30/2/59 "Burned mittens and Yurkin's second quilted jacket."
 
That sounds a lot like she did it to me.                                       
 

May 14, 2020, 02:00:25 AM
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Teddy

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May 16, 2020, 08:34:22 PM
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Naufragia


In reading Zina's letters tonight, I have come to a conclusion .  I believe she is the one who burned the jacket.

She states that she loves Yuri, she is jealous when she sees him with other girls and that this trip is going to be hard because he is going too.

In her diary, she states:  27/1/59  "Today I wore Yuri's mittens, but how I did not want to!"
                                         29/1/59 "We talked about the past.  Such a playboy."  (her, Rustem and Yuri talked)
                                         30/2/59 "Burned mittens and Yurkin's second quilted jacket."
 
That sounds a lot like she did it to me.                                       

You mean she did it deliberately?
 

May 20, 2020, 03:32:42 AM
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sparrow


Hi Naufragia.  Yes, I believe so.  She has been hurt by him.  On 29/1, she calls him a playboy.  It is like he is rubbing salt in a wound (her broken heart).  She retaliates by burning his mittens (which she didn't want to wear in the first place) and his second jacket (which I assume he probably didn't need).  Over the years I have known a number of girls who would have done the same.  bat1
 

May 31, 2020, 10:48:12 AM
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RidgeWatcher


That would be cruel because at one point it is mentioned that he is so poor that his mother, back in the Ukraine(?) had been saving for 2 or 3 years to buy him a proper coat. This is significant because we are talking about a group of ski tourists who didn't have enough money among themselves to pay for all the train tickets up to Dyatlov Pass.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2020, 09:24:09 PM by RidgeWatcher »
 

May 31, 2020, 10:48:04 PM
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sparrow


I think this second jacket may have been Yudin's.  If that was the case, the jacket would not have been necessary for the remaining nine.  A lot of people seem to think that all the hikers got along great, but in reading the diaries, I think they did have moments when everything wasn't so great. kewl1
 

June 01, 2020, 09:41:35 AM
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RidgeWatcher


Is it possible that the Yuri-Zina-Dyatlov involvement could have turned into something negative, especially since Zina may have burnt the jacket and gloves, that impoverished Yuri may have valued highly?
 

June 02, 2020, 12:42:31 AM
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sparrow


I do not think that there was anything between Igor and Zina.  There is no real mention of him in her letters.  She talked about Yuri and how much she still loved him.  I am somewhat inclined to believe they may have had a bit of a physical altercation that night or the night before.  Zina was said to have a wound on the back of her hand that (the so called experts say) looked like an injury from hitting someone in the mouth and Yuri was supposed to have had an injury to his lip or mouth that looks like someone slugged him.  She also looks like someone punched her in the eye.  These wounds could be from a fight with other people, but I think if those three wounds could be found to match up, we might have something (at least where those injuries are concerned. bat1
« Last Edit: June 02, 2020, 01:00:01 AM by sparrow »
 

June 02, 2020, 09:44:22 PM
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Naufragia


Hi Sparrow

I have no trouble believing that Zina burned the clothes accidentally-on-purpose. Doroshenko's presence was clearly very difficult for her. I don't understand why they didn't tell her he was coming until the last minute, that's just mean.

I don't think it does any good to pretend that there weren't frictions and interpersonal difficulties between the hikers, whether that's the Zina-Doroshenko issue, Lyuda's moodiness, Kolevatov's argumentativeness, or Dyatlov's bossiness. Things like that matter less when everything's going well, but can matter a lot when people are tired and uncomfortable. It doesn't mean it had anything to do with their deaths.

Reading Zina's letters is very moving. The extra insight into the hikers' lives and characters these documents give us is really special.
 

June 02, 2020, 11:23:48 PM
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sparrow


I think learning more about each hiker individually and how they interacted together, helps us to understand them better as people (they become much more human).  They are not perfect like they are sometimes made out to be; they ARE human.  Maybe,  if we can understand them better, it might be a tiny bit easier to figure out what happened or maybe at least eliminate some scenarios.
 

June 03, 2020, 02:46:54 PM
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
I think learning more about each hiker individually and how they interacted together, helps us to understand them better as people (they become much more human).  They are not perfect like they are sometimes made out to be; they ARE human.  Maybe,  if we can understand them better, it might be a tiny bit easier to figure out what happened or maybe at least eliminate some scenarios.

You will find nothing that suggests that the Dyatlov Group were in any way responsible for what happened.
DB
 

June 04, 2020, 01:34:54 AM
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sparrow


Hello Sarapuk.

I personally do not believe that there is much that most of us on the forum will really be able to figure out.  We could maybe find the answers to  some of the less scientific questions, but most of the big  questions will probably have to be answered by experts in various fields (provided they have the information they need). But, despite what I believe, I too am trying to solve this terrible mystery. read1
« Last Edit: June 04, 2020, 01:42:25 AM by sparrow »
 

June 09, 2020, 02:46:50 PM
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
Hello Sarapuk.

I personally do not believe that there is much that most of us on the forum will really be able to figure out.  We could maybe find the answers to  some of the less scientific questions, but most of the big  questions will probably have to be answered by experts in various fields (provided they have the information they need). But, despite what I believe, I too am trying to solve this terrible mystery. read1

Thank you Sparrow. We too can be experts. The more we investigate the more we become knowledgeable.
DB
 

June 10, 2020, 01:49:44 AM
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sparrow


Hi Sarapuk,

Yes, we can study/research the photos and documents available to us.  But, a lot of the translations from Russian (documents) to English can vary from one person to the next.  I have heard that even Google translate isn't all that accurate. This difference in translations can change our conclusions from one translation to the next.  For example, the "unknown diary" (I believe) belongs to  Alexander from the way one person translates. According to another, I could not come to any kind of conclusion. I really do like to know exactly what something is saying or I figure I am wasting my time trying to come to some conclusion.  My brain just works like that.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2020, 01:56:52 AM by sparrow »