September 25, 2021, 01:45:59 AM
Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: Strong wind blew one away, others rushed to help, but couldn't get back in blizz  (Read 656 times)

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May 24, 2021, 03:48:12 AM
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Sunny


V. I. TEMPALOV WITNESS TESTIMONY says, (he was one of the rescuers) that:
"Below the tent 50-60 m from us on the slope, I found 8 sets of footprints of people that were carefully examined, but they were deformed due to winds and temperature fluctuations. I did not find a ninth track, it was simply not there. I photographed the tracks. They walked down from the tent. Tracks showed me that people were walking a normal step down the mountain. Traces were visible only on the 50 m section, there were not visible any further since going down the mountain the snow became deeper. At the bottom of the mountain flows a river up to 70 cm deep in a ravine where the depth of the snow in places reaches 2 to 6 m thick.
In the exact direction of the tracks were found the bodies of the 5 frozen students. There is no need for me to describe how and where the bodies were found, you can refer to the protocol of inspection of the scene.
From documents, diaries of students, records of the latter it is clear to me that the students died on February 1 or 2, 1959. From a number of testimonies of witnesses it is clear to me that these days in the mountains and not only in the mountains there was a strong wind and it was very cold. Based on the discovered bodies (in the number of five people), the conditions in which they were found, it is clear to me that all the students died from exposure, attack on them is excluded. This is my personal
opinion. I can come to a final conclusion only after the discovery and inspection of the remaining students, i.e. 4 more people. the students could have left the tent because one of them went out and the wind carried him away and he cried out. The students were alarmed, rushed out of the tent to his rescue and were blown away by the wind, but with blizzard-winds they could not get back to the tent. And they froze.... "https://dyatlovpass.com/case-files-309-312?rbid=17743

I think this explains everything. They found old pee near the tent. One went out from tent to pee, and got blown away by strong wind. Others went quickly to help him, so they didn't take warm clothes, but when trying to find him, they realized the wind doesn't allow them to get back at the tent. So they dicided it is best to go down and wait untill the wind calms down. Unfortunately they froze. it also explains some broken ribs and other injuries they had. There is a video on Youtube showing how people can't walk in strong wind. Look especially those who try to walk on ice, it is impossible:
 

May 24, 2021, 06:57:40 AM
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MDGross


A few questions: Why did all 8 hikers rush out when one or two could have rescued the one rolling down the slope? Then if help was still needed, the others would have time to put on shoes and coats. If the person in distress had rolled 60, 70 or a 100 meters, wouldn't at least a few of the footsteps found at 50-60 meters show people running? How are you going to catch up to the person rolling when you are walking in an orderly fashion? Also, the hikers were only wearing shirts and ski pants. At minus 20-30℉ with wind speeds of 50-60 km/h, they in all likelihood would have died from hypothermia before even reaching the forest.
 

May 26, 2021, 07:10:21 AM
Reply #2
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Sunny


A few questions: Why did all 8 hikers rush out when one or two could have rescued the one rolling down the slope? Then if help was still needed, the others would have time to put on shoes and coats. If the person in distress had rolled 60, 70 or a 100 meters, wouldn't at least a few of the footsteps found at 50-60 meters show people running? How are you going to catch up to the person rolling when you are walking in an orderly fashion? Also, the hikers were only wearing shirts and ski pants. At minus 20-30℉ with wind speeds of 50-60 km/h, they in all likelihood would have died from hypothermia before even reaching the forest.
we don't have to know all the details. Maybe one flew away by wind, his body was smashed on the ground, he screamed for help, maybe he was bleeding from head and had wounds, he couldn't walk. Some rushed to help him but couldn't get back to tent, so others went trying to help those, etc. Then nobody couldn't get back.
Maybe they didn't think they needed shoes or coats.
But yes I understand the footsteps walking down in calmly manner is a bit problem...
 

May 31, 2021, 04:56:43 PM
Reply #3
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Manti


"Walking down in a calm manner" is not fact, it's just someone's assumption.

Teddy got an expert's opinion on the footsteps and the result is that they are from people wearing shoes. You can find it on this page: https://dyatlovpass.com/1079
 
How to interpret that result i'm not sure.
 

June 01, 2021, 01:15:37 AM
Reply #4
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EBE


I would not take the alleged conclusion that the footprints were from shoes for granted. If you look at some of the closed footprints, you can clearly see that the front of the prints do not have an oval shape as from a shoe, but are longer where the toe is, and overall they resemble the barefoot prints.

Also, the footprints in a form of stacked columns is possible to create only if there is a lot of snow (the foot presses a column of snow, which remains compacted after the rest of snow is blown off by the wind or melted). So this means that they were simply wading in deep snow (which was blown off later), so their steps were shorter and this makes the impression that they were not in a hurry.

Teddy says that the footprints were from shoes, made by people who staged up the tent on the slope. It is strange then that the sizes of the prints are so different. There are small prints (made by girls) and large prints.. Also, the prints would then be in both directions: to the slope and from the slope.

I have also noticed that there is at least one large print of a bare foot visible at the cedar (it is strange that it was preserved). There are probably other barefoot prints too, but those are not so clearly visible. Please zoom at the lower center of this image:


 

June 02, 2021, 12:58:40 PM
Reply #5
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zirconium


The magnitude of the injuries seen on Dubinina and Zolotaryov at least, and likely also Thibeaux-Brignolle, require much more force than falling down from a standing or walking position could provide. If the injuries are from a fall, it had to be at least a couple storeys, probably more.