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Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: carbon monoxide (CO)  (Read 343 times)

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February 04, 2020, 12:23:51 PM
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Ogar


Hi,
due to circumstances and facts - that they had wood stoves in the tent, there was a snow storm outside, someone had cut the tent up from inside… it is possible that their behavior was caused by poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning incomplete combustion, which could actually happen here.

Description of the problem.

The cause of the elevated concentrations of poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) produced by the combustion of any fuel is its incomplete combustion. Leaks in the combustion plant and flue gas duct penetrate the space where the combustion plant (stove) is located and become dangerous to the occupants of this space because carbon monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas where its presence is unrecognizable by the human senses because it is toxic gas without taste, color and odor. It enters the body only by inhalation, affecting the heart and vascular and nervous system. At low concentrations, one may feel tired and have a headache. At higher concentrations, disturbances of vision and coordination, severe headache, dizziness, confusing behavior, and nausea may occur. Very high concentrations are then fatal. Carbon monoxide poisoning is always serious, initially inconspicuous, but all the more insidious as its presence is unrecognizable by the human senses.
In the case of carbon monoxide poisoning, headaches are always first felt. As CO levels increase, coordination, impairment and cognitive impairment are impaired. The toxicity of CO is given by preventing / restricting the transfer of oxygen from the lungs to the tissues. Carbon monoxide is rapidly released from the lungs into the blood, where it binds to iron in the blood dye hemoglobin to form carboxyhemglobin (COHb) and limits oxygen transfer.
• Lighter poisoning is manifested by headache, pounding of blood in the head, pressure on the chest, dizziness. Nausea or vomiting occurs.
• Severe carbon monoxide poisoning is characterized by tendency to faint, weakness and increase in body temperature. Feelings are sometimes similar to alcohol intoxication, and the victim may behave aggressively. The affected person may be strongly disoriented and may become unconscious in the contaminated area.
• Death occurs from asphyxiation and can occur almost immediately after severe exposure as well as delay. The skin color changes to cherry red, which is caused by the presence of blood with (COHb) in the capillaries.

The table shows the corresponding exposure time to CO concentration levels.
CO concentration in mg / m3 Exposure time interval CO concentration in mg / m3 Exposure time interval
100 15 minutes 30 60 min
60 30 minutes 10 8 hours
Based on these data, the WHO recommends a concentration of CO in the air of not more than 10 mg / m3 as an eight-hour average.

More information:
• In some studies, a small but statistically significant reduction in exercise time to exhaustion was observed at COHb concentrations of 3.3-4.3%, although the maximum aerobic capacity was not reduced.
• Impact on neurological functions in the form of impaired coordination, reduced attention and cognitive abilities has also been demonstrated in healthy young people with COHb concentrations above 5%.
• At COHb concentrations greater than 5-10%, many functional failures and subjective symptoms such as headache and dizziness may already occur.

Pa pá Ogar

February 05, 2020, 09:15:08 AM
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jarrfan


Re: Carbon monoxide poisoning, anything is possible. There is question whether the stove was lit that night because it was found on the floor of the tent with wood, making the searchers believe it had not been used, but that is debatable. Certainly carbon monoxide poisoning is possible and they were so tired from the brutal day that they did not extinguish the embers correctly. There was said to be a slab of meat, but it is not indicated whether it was cooked or raw. Also mentioned was a pot of cocoa ready to be heated or consumed, not sure which. Since the blankets and sleeping gear were found neatly folded in one corner, this indicates they were not asleep when the event happened. Waking up with headache, dizziness and sickness would certainly make the scenario of tearing out of the tent unprepared a possibility. But if they were just sitting in the tent, that possibility does not seem as likely, someone would have noticed the early onset if they were awake. As far as the cuts in the tent, these were made carefully and  cutting through two seams which would require somewhat of a sawing motion. I can't believe they would  take this kind of time if they were  overcome  by carbon dioxide. It is a mystery for certain. May they rest in peace.

February 05, 2020, 12:01:18 PM
Reply #2
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Jean Daniel Reuss


Quote from: Introductions / carbon monoxide (CO) Ogar « on: February 04, 2020, 12:23:51 PM »
.... • Severe carbon monoxide poisoning is characterized by tendency to faint, weakness and increase in body temperature. Feelings are sometimes similar to alcohol intoxication, and the victim may behave aggressively. The affected person may be strongly disoriented and may become unconscious in the contaminated area. ...................

This is a perfectly truthful post, but it does not explain the DPI.

Carbon monoxide CO is indeed very toxic even at low doses, causing many fatal accidents.
CO intoxication does not cause real mental disorders, but rather painless sleepiness, which means that one can die without realizing it.

CO intoxication can cause dizziness, delusions, mental confusion, but this hardly seems compatible with physical fitness, which is indicated by their long walks in deep snow and intense cold.

Quote from: Introductions / carbon monoxide (CO) jarrfan « on: February 05, 2020, at 09:15:08 AM »
There is question whether the stove was lit that night because it was found on the floor of the tent with wood, making the searchers believe it had not been used, but that is debatable........................

See : https://dyatlovpass.com/theories?flp=1#stove
It is of course possible that the stove was lighted despite testimony that the stove had not been used during the fatal night of February 1-2, 1959.
However, poor wood combustion also gives off a lot of smoke, which is very unpleasant and makes you cough, but also warns of the risk of asphyxiation.

In this case the hikers were able to get out of their tent. If there had been a bad draught with smoke it would have been enough, once outside, to ventilate the inside of the tent for a few minutes so that there would have been no more danger.

The stove built and already used several times by Dyatlov had a chimney that can be seen in the photos to evacuate the smoke from the combustion.
Jean Daniel Reuss

Rational guidance =

• There is nothing supernatural and mysterious about the injuries suffered by the Dyatlov group. They are all consistent with an attack by a group of professional killers who wanted to take the lives of the nine  [Per Inge Oestmoen].

• Now let us search for answers to: WHO ? WHY ? HOW ?

• The scenario must be consistent with the historical, political and psychological  contexts.

• The solution takes in consideration all known findings.