September 30, 2020, 11:36:32 PM
Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: Earthquake  (Read 260 times)

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July 22, 2020, 09:08:47 AM
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MDGross


I apologize if this subject has been discussed elsewhere in the forum. But wonder if the Dyatlov group felt strong tremors from an earthquake. Fearing that an avalanche was soon to follow, they hurried out of the tent underdressed as they were. Over the last 60 years, much has been written about how avalanches could not occur on the slope where the group camped. But how much did the Dyatlov group know? It was night, snowing and windy; they might have believed that an avalanche was imminent. As they walked down the slope, they didn't hear the characteristic sounds of an avalanche. So why not head back to the tent? Because aftershocks continued to worry them. Better to seek the shelter of the woods and then wait until everything settled down.
Just a crazy thought, but I did find this quote on RealnoeVremya.com from Sept. 2018: ''At the moment, the Urals are experiencing tectonic uplift — by 5 mm a year. It happens that the plate is retarded in motion, but the energy does not go away, it accumulates in the form of these 5 mm a year and then such earthquakes happen once every 10 years. Fortunately, small, because we are inside the continent, that is, it is intercontinental mountain building.
Source : https://realnoevremya.com/articles/2839-earthquake-in-ural-mountains-region

July 22, 2020, 11:03:38 AM
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Ting


Take a look at the IRIS Earthquake browser for Urals area - Seems the area for Dyatlov incident is fairly quiet with a 3.1 magnitude in 2014 20 km distance, a 2.8 about 130 km distant in 2001 and one in 1987 at 4.5 magnitude 147 km distance. Ironically there is an approximate 14 year pattern and if you go back 28 years prior to 1987 it takes you to - guess where ? Might make a nice little cherry on top for an earthquake proponent but just a weak coincidence for me. There are more numerous earthquakes a fair way further south.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2020, 11:11:24 AM by Ting »

July 22, 2020, 02:56:05 PM
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sarapuk

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I apologize if this subject has been discussed elsewhere in the forum. But wonder if the Dyatlov group felt strong tremors from an earthquake. Fearing that an avalanche was soon to follow, they hurried out of the tent underdressed as they were. Over the last 60 years, much has been written about how avalanches could not occur on the slope where the group camped. But how much did the Dyatlov group know? It was night, snowing and windy; they might have believed that an avalanche was imminent. As they walked down the slope, they didn't hear the characteristic sounds of an avalanche. So why not head back to the tent? Because aftershocks continued to worry them. Better to seek the shelter of the woods and then wait until everything settled down.
Just a crazy thought, but I did find this quote on RealnoeVremya.com from Sept. 2018: ''At the moment, the Urals are experiencing tectonic uplift — by 5 mm a year. It happens that the plate is retarded in motion, but the energy does not go away, it accumulates in the form of these 5 mm a year and then such earthquakes happen once every 10 years. Fortunately, small, because we are inside the continent, that is, it is intercontinental mountain building.
Source : https://realnoevremya.com/articles/2839-earthquake-in-ural-mountains-region

There are no reports of Earthquakes in the area at that time. And even if there was there would be signs. Also it would have had to have been one almighty Earthquake to cause the Dyatolov Group to abandon their life shelter.
DB

July 23, 2020, 02:42:57 AM
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PROXIUS


As a survivor of 1999 Turkey's 7.4 earthquake I know that mountainsides are the safest terrains where you barely feel even highest earthquakes therefore safest zones. I don't think even if they felt a little vibration that would cause them to run for life and drop dead.. They were professionals at the end.

July 23, 2020, 07:54:18 AM
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MDGross


Proxius and sarapuk, I'm not saying they feared for their lives because they felt the tremors of an earthquake. What they feared was an avalanche caused by the earthquake, a not uncommon occurrence in some mountain regions. Although an avalanche didn't occur, the Dyatlov group "believed" that it could occur. Perception becomes reality when you're on a mountain slope at night in snow and wind. And perhaps there was no earthquake, but maybe the Soviet military making a bombing run. Such tremendous blasts could trigger an avalanche. Or maybe they heard sounds carried on the wind of an avalanche nearby. I feel that over the years layers of complexity have been placed on an event that wasn't complex at all. Nine young people camped in a wide-open, vulnerable spot in the freezing cold and snow, and then a misperception.

July 23, 2020, 01:59:58 PM
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sarapuk

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As a survivor of 1999 Turkey's 7.4 earthquake I know that mountainsides are the safest terrains where you barely feel even highest earthquakes therefore safest zones. I don't think even if they felt a little vibration that would cause them to run for life and drop dead.. They were professionals at the end.

Its always good to have real life examples to help get to the bottom of this Mystery.
DB

July 23, 2020, 02:04:17 PM
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sarapuk

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Proxius and sarapuk, I'm not saying they feared for their lives because they felt the tremors of an earthquake. What they feared was an avalanche caused by the earthquake, a not uncommon occurrence in some mountain regions. Although an avalanche didn't occur, the Dyatlov group "believed" that it could occur. Perception becomes reality when you're on a mountain slope at night in snow and wind. And perhaps there was no earthquake, but maybe the Soviet military making a bombing run. Such tremendous blasts could trigger an avalanche. Or maybe they heard sounds carried on the wind of an avalanche nearby. I feel that over the years layers of complexity have been placed on an event that wasn't complex at all. Nine young people camped in a wide-open, vulnerable spot in the freezing cold and snow, and then a misperception.

Yes but if an experienced Group of young guys believed that an Avalanche was about to happen it still doesnt explain why they left the Tent ill equipped and went down the slope for a mile or so.  And sometimes the best thing to do when an Avalanche approaches is to lie flat, not stand up and walk in the open.
DB