October 28, 2020, 01:48:40 AM
Dyatlov Pass Forum

Author Topic: Acute Stress Reaction  (Read 1647 times)

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December 24, 2019, 12:09:23 AM
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Lupos


Hello forum readers,

on August 9, 2019 I published an article here under the theory "Katabatic Wind".
Dr. Borzenkov (WAB) was so friendly and corrected many inaccuracies. We have regular e-mail contact.
R. Holmgren also has lively e-mail contact.
Then I completely revised my article. I would now like to publish this new article here. Teddy was kind enough to open a new theory discussion.
The decisive factor was that I developed a new theory that explains the "Dyatlov accident" from the medical, psychological side. The precise definition of the medical situation is precisely defined by the World Health Organization (WHO).

My article is written in German. The translation into English would have cost me a lot of time again. And I've already spent around 500 hours on it. But that's no longer a problem these days with the translation programs.
In addition, many read only parts of the article and they are mostly explanatory pictures.

I wish everyone a Merry Christmas



Abstract:

The following article examines the "Dyatlov accident" at the "Kholat" in 1959.
In the first part, all relevant orographic data are recorded.
Then the weather from January 31, 1959 to February 2, 1959 is recorded in detail, based on the positions of the sun and the relief of the "Kholat" and the western pre-valley.
With the help of the "Venturi Effect", the flow conditions of the wind to the "Kholat" are calculated by developing a formula. The "Mass Inflow" of very dense and cold air from the north, which flows in from the northern slopes of the western pre-valley, is considered as a very decisive factor. This cold air supply corresponds exactly to the definition of the "Catabatic Wind".
You can divide the wind area of the general weather situation into 2 areas. Wind from SW to WNW and WNW to NNW.
A cyclone that was formed in the North at the time is considered.
Based on several expeditions, recently by Dr. Borzenkov, R. Holmgren, Joshua Gates and others the formula is checked and confirmed using the wind speeds.

In the second part, meteorological waves are examined and the visible signs of strong winds in the form of snow fields and wind abrasion zones on the mountain peaks are documented.
The possibility of "Karman’s Vortex", which can be observed worldwide on mountains, is being considered at the "Kholat".

In the third part, various theories that could have led to misfortune are discussed. Special mention should be made of "Electrostatic Charges", "Impulse Changes" of the strong wind and "Infra-Sound".

Completely new as a theory is the medically defined "stress response" according to ICD-10-WHO 2019 (F43.0).
https://icd.who.int/browse10/2016/en#/F40-F48
https://www.dimdi.de/static/de/klassifikationen/icd/icd-10-who/kode-suche/htmlamtl2019/block-f40-f48.htm

Afterwards, the group, which was brought to the limit of its physical and psychological powers by the hurricane and the cold, gained the clear realization that their death is imminent and develops the "stress response".
The consequence of this is consciousness narrowing, limited attention, the inability to process stimuli, disorientation and escape reactions (Fugue)
The behavior in the tent discussed worldwide and leaving the tent, sometimes without shoes and outer clothing, can be easily explained.

I have decided to completely rework the article. The general weather situation for 1 and 2 February 1959 is now presented in detail based on all the facts available to me on the Internet.
 I ask for your understanding. In a few weeks I will make the new article available here in the forum.


« Last Edit: May 27, 2020, 08:02:57 AM by Lupos »

December 24, 2019, 12:25:26 PM
Reply #1
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sarapuk

Case-Files Achievement Recipient
You have obviously carried out a thorough study and congratulations for that. The basic idea that the Dyatlov Group became disorientated etc as been put in the Forum before. Your study obviously goes further into the detail of disorientation. However DISORIENTATION from whatever cause will never explain some of the unusual injuries that some of the Dyatlov Group suffered. Also there is doubt has to why disorientation would be the reason for all of the Dyatlov Group to leave the Tent not properly dressed and head towards the Forest. However there is one possible explanation where we could put in disorientation and thats if SOMETHING scared the living daylights out of them all. Something so terrible that they all became mentally scared to death and as it turned out by the look on some of their faces LITERALLY SCARED TO DEATH.  Merry Christmas.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2020, 07:06:58 AM by Teddy »
DB

February 07, 2020, 03:08:53 PM
Reply #2
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Jean Daniel Reuss


Quote from: Lupos Acute Stress Reaction December 24, 2019, 12:09:23 AM
Afterwards, the group, which was brought to the limit of its physical and psychological powers by the hurricane and the cold, gained the clear realization that their death is imminent and develops the "stress response".
The consequence of this is consciousness narrowing, limited attention, the inability to process stimuli, disorientation and escape reactions (Fugue)
The behavior in the tent discussed worldwide and leaving the tent, sometimes without shoes and outer clothing, can be easily explained.


From what we know about the characters of the 9 hikers, thanks to the Dyatlovpass.com website, this argument is not convincing.
On the contrary, IMHO the group was very far from having reached its limits of its physical and psychological powers.
The group had only encountered a bit of wind and cold in the last few days but this was to be expected and it was what they were waiting for to show their qualities as Siberian hikers.

Moreover, it seems to me that Mr WAB also feels the same way.

Quote from: WAB, Re: Dyatlov Pass Forum > Theories Discussion > General Discussion > The ravine deaths - a theory  April 05, 2019, 01:48:33 PM
Reply #86
....2.The Group was amicable and is well prepared for taiga and cold conditions. It is necessary notice that at that time ability and desire operate in collective were much stronger, than now. After WWII has passed only 14 years, namely because of such qualities of the USSR could win war with fascists though in the beginning forces, means and skills were very unequal. It has been very well acquired even by following generation which was not at war. Besides, it is one of national lines of Russian character....


It required much more powerful and organized causes to transform the psyches of these young people in perfect physical and mental health and
I arrived at a reenactment which seems to be able to explain all the statements gathered on this website.

   Of course it is a hypothesis that remains without indisputable proof and that you will find here :
               https://forum.dyatlovpass.com/index.php?topic=411.0 --> Reply #15
with the important considerations of the physiologist Eduard Tumanov at the top of the page.

   I would be glad to have your opinion and... your objections.

Jean Daniel Reuss

Rational guidance =

• There is nothing supernatural and mysterious about the injuries suffered by the Dyatlov group. They are all consistent with an attack by a group of professional killers who wanted to take the lives of the nine  [Per Inge Oestmoen].

• Now let us search for answers to: WHO ? WHY ? HOW ?

• The scenario must be consistent with the historical, political and psychological  contexts.

• The solution takes in consideration all known findings.

February 10, 2020, 01:16:21 PM
Reply #3
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Lupos


Hello "Jean Daniel Reuss",

"From what we know about the characters of the 9 hikers, thanks to the Dyatlovpass.com website, this argument is not convincing."

Thank you for your detailed review of my 150 page article.

My opinion about your hypothesis is that your hypothesis does not convince me.


October 10, 2020, 01:43:54 PM
Reply #4
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RidgeWatcher


Hello Lupos,

As far as ICD codes ensue are you suggesting that a "Folie a Deux" suddenly on Kholat Syakhl became a Folie a Neuf ? Do you consider that there was a timed insanity with a brief or lasting reprieve because of the somewhat organization between some member groups at the cedar and in the forest. I don't read German and it would be some time before my nephew or niece could translate your report for me, due to covid. Have you ever seen or read about a Folie a Trois, or more? Thank you.

This is what comes to my mind when I hear the term Folie a Deux but could this multiply?:


October 10, 2020, 06:00:27 PM
Reply #5
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Investigator


"Pro" investigators work with the evidence that exists.  They can look for other evidence, but until that is "booked in," one should see what the existing evidence says first.  In this case, the evidence is abundant, though some of it was mishandled, unfortunately.  They were not incoherent or irrational once they left the tent area and in fact it seems they secured the tent well (otherwise, with the winds coming down that mountain, their belongings would have been spread out all over the mountainside by the time the rescuers got there).  There are two possible irrational elements, though; one is why the tent was cut open, if it was, and two, why they didn't at least take their blankets with them (the footwear and heavy coats might have gotten frozen up).  We can only guess at the first, but we can't assume that when they cut the tent all was well.  It must have been incredibly cold and ice might have been collapsing the tent.  When they tried to knock it off, the ice situation might have become even worse, and so they decided that securing the tent was crucial.  If they fought, leading to the cutting of the tent, it would be impossible to ever demonstrate that for sure, but there is some evidence that points in this direction.

That leaves us the question about leaving the tent without their heavy coats and proper footwear (except apparently for the two who acted as sentries that night), or even blankets.  Prior to 1959, at least in the USA, there had been newspaper stories about people surviving in the snow in ways that seem incredible.  In a nation with a lot of cold weather, like the Soviet Union, it's likely there were similar stories, and it may be that they simply thought hypothermia would take longer to set in than it did, or that they would be able to find adequate shelter down at the tree line, or perhaps their notions about hypothermia were very unrealistic.  If they take the blankets, the blankets are likely to get iced up and then they'd have to deal with that problem, so if they thought survival wouldn't be that difficult after they left the tent, it would make sense that securing the tent and its contents would be the top priority.  Often, we can look back and ask, "why did they do that," but in fact its easy to second guess, especially if in this case, Igor insisted that he knew exactly how to survive for several hours outside the tent that night.